Faculty and Staff

Faculty


 Tina K. Veale, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Professor and Administrative Director

Ph.D., Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, 1998
M.A., Speech-Language Pathology, Miami University (Ohio), 1980
B.S., Speech and Hearing Therapy, Miami University (Ohio), 1979

Dr. Veale is Professor and founding Program Director of the Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She founded two other graduate programs at Midwestern University in Downers Grove, Illinois and Glendale, Arizona. She teaches courses in neuroscience, including human brain dissection; child language development and disorders; social communication disorders, including autism; motor speech disorders; and research methods. Her scholarship includes authorship of a variety of materials for the study of neuroscience and resource books for guiding intervention for children with autism and social communication disorder. Dr. Veale’s research involves evaluation of accessible methods for oral and written language sampling and analysis; evaluation of effective methods for improving written narration in adolescents with high functioning autism; and differential diagnosis of autism and related conditions. Dr. Veale is a Fellow of the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and a tenured member of the Lewis faculty.


 Victoria Reynolds, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BSc. (Hons), LL.B.

Associate Professor

Ph.D., University of Western Australia, 2015
BSc. (Hons), Curtin University, 2007
LL.B., Osaka University, 1998

Dr. Reynolds is Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She teaches courses in voice and resonance disorders, research design and implementation, and pediatric feeding and swallowing. Dr. Reynolds has worked in school-based and community clinics, as well as in adult and pediatric acute and tertiary care. She has held faculty appointments at colleges in Australia and the United States. Dr. Reynolds has published nationally and internationally and presented her research on four continents. Her research and scholarly interests include dysphonia related to prematurity of birth, developing new ways of measuring voice quality in both children and adults, voice ergonomics, and stuttering. 


 Carol M. Szymanski, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CHSE

Associate Professor and Undergraduate Program Director

Ph.D., Special Education, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1998
M.A., Speech-Language Pathology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1992
B.S., Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 1990

Dr. Szymanski is Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology at Lewis University. She teaches courses in language development and disorders, assessment of communication disorders, literacy, and professional ethics. Dr. Szymanski is a Certified Healthcare Simulation Educator and has worked to create virtual clinical simulations for audiology and speech-language pathology students to obtain clinical knowledge and skill as part of graduate clinical training. Her primary areas of interest include language development and disorders, assessment and diagnosis of communication disorders, teens and young adults with significant communication disorders, social and functional communication, and the use of clinical simulation in graduate education in communication sciences and disorders. Dr. Szymanski’s scholarly work and research interests are in the areas of clinical simulation in graduate education, clinical education, and social communication skills and self-advocacy in teens and young adults with communication disorders. As a clinician, Dr. Szymanski has primarily provided speech and language services to teens and young adults with language learning disabilities, autism, cognitive impairment, syndromes/genetic disorders, and traumatic brain injury. She is a long-time member of and volunteer for the Illinois Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She is a Fellow of ISHA and has served the state of Illinois on the Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology for the Department of Financial and Professional Regulation.


 Ann Guernon, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor

Ph.D., Health Sciences, Northern Illinois University, 2020
M.S., Speech-Language Pathology, Northeastern University, 1996
B.S., Speech and Hearing Science, Moorhead State University, 1994

Dr. Guernon is Assistant Professor of Speech-Language Pathology at Lewis University. She teaches courses in aphasia, adult cognitive-communication disorders, practice issues and complex cases in healthcare and research methods. She is interested in assessment and intervention for language and cognitive-communication disorders in adults with acquired neurologic disorders, specific assessment and measurement considerations in assessment requiring clinician reported ratings and the role of the caregiver in rehabilitation. As a clinician, Dr. Guernon has provided services to people with communication and swallowing disorders across the spectrum of healthcare including, acute trauma facilities, community hospitals, acute inpatient rehabilitation, skilled nursing facilities, outpatient and day rehabilitation and home health. She has extensive experience managing clinical trials involving treatment development for people with traumatic brain injuries. Her research focuses on developing effective treatments for acquired cognitive-communication disorders, and injury prevention in youth sports.


 Kristin J. Scavo-Smith, M.S., CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor of Practice
Coordinator of Clinical Education

M.S., Speech Language Pathology, Rush University, 2006
B.S., Communication Sciences and Disorders, Illinois State University, 2004

Professor Scavo-Smith is Assistant Professor of Practice in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She coordinates clinical practicum experiences for students in the MSSLP program. As a clinician, Professor Scavo-Smith has worked across medical settings, including acute inpatient, long term acute care, skilled nursing, home health, acute inpatient rehabilitation, and pediatric outpatient. She has conducted mobile instrumental dysphagia diagnostics and served as a clinical supervisor to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as clinical fellows. Her areas of clinical interest are dysphagia evaluation and treatment, management of patients with head and neck cancer, and assessment and intervention of adults with neurologic disorders.


 Tammy L. Basel, M.S. CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor of Practice
Coordinator of Clinical Education

M.S., Communication Disorders & Sciences, Eastern Illinois University, 1993
B.S., Speech Language Pathology & Audiology, Eastern Illinois University, 1991

Professor Basel is Assistant Professor of Practice in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She currently supervises graduate students in their clinical practicum sites at the Center for Interdisciplinary Tele practice and Neu Roads Brain Injury Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She serves as Coordinator of Clinical Education, providing supervision and guidance to SLP graduate students who are interning at clinical sites located in the Chicagoland area. Professor Basel also instructs two graduate courses, including Speech Sound Disorders and Complex Issues in Education. She serves as co-supervisor for Lewis University’s NSSLHA chapter, providing direction, participation, and organization to the SLP student members.  She has experience in a wide variety of work settings, including private practice, early intervention, hospital acute care & rehabilitation settings, pediatric clinics, and schools. She has served as an autism consultant and district special education liaison. Professor Basel’s primary interests are in the areas of autism spectrum disorders, motor speech disorders, receptive and expressive language disorders, and family education. She believes in the school/therapy/home connection and strives to educate the community regarding communication disorders. Professor Basel has developed a series of apps, titled, “Autism Language Learning” which strives to engage children while learning to use and understand auditory language. Professor Basel has earned several grants and awards during her time in the schools, including a “Children in Motion” mega-grant and STAR 105.5 “Teacher of the Month” recognition.


 Erica Brkovic, M.S., CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor of Practice

M.S., Speech Language Pathology, St. Xavier University, 2004
B.S., Communication Sciences and Disorders, Purdue University, 2002

Professor Brkovic is Assistant Professor of Practice in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She currently supervises graduate students placed at the A.E.R.O. Special Education Cooperative and teaches the graduate level course in Augmentative and Alternative Communication. As a clinician, she has experience working in a myriad of settings, including early intervention, schools, private practice, and a neuropsychological diagnostic center. Her areas of clinical interest are autism spectrum disorder and augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).


 E. Maria Wheeler, M. Ed., CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor of Practice

M.Ed., Speech-Language Pathology, Valdosta State University, 1998
B.S., Speech-Language Pathology, Valdosta State University, 1995

Professor Wheeler is an Assistant Professor of Practice in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She is a clinical educator for graduate students working with the school-age population in Bourbonnais District 53. As a clinician, Professor Wheeler has worked in a variety of settings, including all levels and grades in the schools (preschool through transition), skilled nursing facilities, and clinics. She has 25 years of experience working in Illinois and Georgia public and private schools with children ages 3-21. Her areas of interest include communication and language learning skills for those with autism, dyslexia, social communication disorder, learning disabilities, assistive technology assessment and treatment, and phonological processing/awareness/memory skills for reading and learning. Professor Wheeler has participated in special projects with Northern Illinois University, including university level peer events (for transition age students with disabilities), Special Olympics, and research on wearable technology for students with anxiety.  Professor Wheeler served as the secretary and membership directory author for the DuPage County Speech-Language-Hearing Association for many years and participates in local support group meetings of the National Stuttering Association (West Chicago chapter). She has extensive experience delivering specialized, student-specific training information to staff and developing visual and social language visual supports for communication. 


 Sarah Wu, Ed.S., M.A., CCC-SLP

Assistant Professor of Practice
Coordinator of Clinical Education

Ed.S., Curriculum and Instruction, National-Louis University, 2022
M.A., Speech-Language Pathology, Northwestern University, 2006
B.A., Spanish, University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1999

Professor Wu is an Assistant Professor of Practice and Coordinator of Clinical Education in the Master of Science Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She supervises graduate students offsite in a placement requiring trauma-informed care and service to a bilingual caseload.  Professor Wu has worked with bilingual students throughout her career. She worked in school-based settings in urban, suburban, and rural communities for over 17 years, including four years in teletherapy. In addition to school-based settings, Professor Wu has worked in a pediatric therapy clinic and early intervention. Her primary interests are in the area of bilingual language development, delays, and disorders. She has earned ESL and bilingual endorsements to her Illinois State Board of Education Professional Educator’s License for speech-language pathology. Sarah Wu also founded Bilingual Speech Therapy Resources LLC, a private practice dedicated to the creation of therapy materials.


 Irene R. Bucher, M.A., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator

M.A., in Speech-Language Pathology, Northwestern University, 1979
B.S., in Speech-Language Pathology, Northwestern University, 1977

Professor Bucher is an adjunct professor and clinical educator in the Master of Science Program in Speech-Language Pathology at Lewis University. Professor Bucher developed and directs the SLP Specialty Clinic at Mayslake Village which provides introductory level instruction in evaluation, treatment planning, lesson administration and documentation for adults with a variety of speech, language, voice, AAC, and cognitive communication deficits. She also teaches the graduate course on Motor Speech Disorders. Professor Bucher has maintained ASHA CCC and Illinois state licensure by complying with continuing education requirements; she has earned six ACE Awards for Continuing Education from ASHA. Professor Bucher’s experience ranges from staff SLP, senior SLP, to program director. She has worked full-time and part-time with clients across the lifespan, from the patients in Neonatal ICU to Hospice. Work settings included a non-profit community clinic, hospital-based rehab clinic, SNFs, private practice with specialty in functional voice disorders, and most recently in both home health and hospital settings. Professor Bucher's primary focus has been on adults with a variety of neurological deficits including aphasia, dysarthria and apraxia, and voice disorders. She is certified in SPEAKOUT!, a program for patients with Parkinson's Disease. Professor Bucher has worked with laryngectomees, helped coordinate the North Shore Lost Chords club, and participated in committees in the North Shore American Cancer Society. She is a past chairperson of the Association of Clinical Programs in Speech Pathology and Audiology, Chicago. IL.


 Stacey Carroll, M.A., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator

M.A., Speech-Language Pathology, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2004
B.S., Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, 2002

Professor Carroll is an Adjunct Professor and clinical educator in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She is currently a clinical supervisor for graduate students in a public high school setting. As a speech-language pathologist, her clinical experiences have included private clinics, public schools, therapeutic schools, and early intervention.  Professor Carroll also evaluates speech-language, auditory processing and social communication skills for children ages 3-18 as part of an interdisciplinary neuropsychology team.  Professor Carroll's primary interests include autism spectrum disorders, early language development, and literacy development in children with language impairment.  


 Karen Czarnik, Ph.D., CCC-SLP/L

Adjunct Professor

Ph.D., Special Education, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1997
M.H.Sc., Communication Disorders, Governors State University, 1984
B.S., Speech-Language Pathology, Saint Xavier University, 1982

Dr. Czarnik is an adjunct professor in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. Currently, she teaches courses in Fluency Disorders and Counseling, and Research Methods. She has worked in a variety of clinical and academic settings throughout her career, including public schools, private practice, and university settings. Her primary areas of interest are stuttering and fluency disorders across the lifespan, as well as speech sound disorders in children.  Dr. Czarnik facilitates an adult support group through the National Stuttering Association.


 Rachel C. Davidson, M.S., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator

M.S., Communication Disorders, University of Wisconsin, 2001
B.A., Psychology, University of Wisconsin, 1995

Professor Davidson is an adjunct professor in the Master of Science Speech Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She is currently a faculty clinical supervisor for graduate students working with the school age population. As a clinician, Professor Davidson has worked in a variety of settings including skilled nursing facilities, early intervention, home health and schools. She has 18 years of experience working in Illinois public schools with children ages 3-21. Her areas of interest include stuttering, selective mutism, aphasia, traumatic brain injury and articulation.


 David L. Frazier, M.Ed.

Adjunct Professor

M.Ed. Higher Education; Educational Leadership, Liberty University 2021
B.S. Communication Sciences and Disorders; Audiology, Illinois State University

Professor Frazier is an adjunct professor in the undergraduate Communication Sciences and Disorders program at Lewis University. He teaches the Introduction to Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation courses. He serves on the board of the Illinois Deaf and Hard of Hearing Commission as a Commissioner within his second appointed term. He also serves as co-chair of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee, and the Student Involvement Committee within the Illinois Speech and Hearing Association. Additionally, he serves on the board of directors as the Audiology Chair for the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing. As a hearing health practitioner for nearly 12 years, he has performed hearing evaluations for many patients; from birth to 105 years old! He is licensed to practice as a Hearing Instrument Specialist in the states of Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin and furthermore, a Certified Occupational Hearing Conservationist. He has received advanced training to perform the Auditory Brainstem Response test for newborns. His scientific research encompasses Aphasia, Neurology, Hearing Aids, Psychoacoustics, Hearing Science, Speech, and Aural Rehabilitation. 


 Lisa M. Gardner, M.S., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator

M.S, Speech-Language Pathology, MGH Institute of Health Professions, 2011 
B.S., Special Education, Bridgewater State College, 2009 

Professor Gardner is an adjunct professor in the Master of Science Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She currently serves as a clinical educator for graduate students working with adults with acquired brain injuries. As a clinician, Professor Gardner has worked in a variety of settings including outpatient, acute care, inpatient rehab, and skilled nursing settings serving clients across the lifespan with a variety of communication or swallowing disorders. Her clinical practice is guided by a foundation of functional interventions that focus on life participation, patient agency, and a family-centered approach. She has a strong interest in neurologically modulated processes impacting speech, language, feeding, and swallowing and has earned endorsement as Qualified Bilingual Staff (QBS) for medical settings.  


 Gaylene Oesterreich, M.S., CCC- SLP

Adjunct Clinical Professor

M.A, Speech-Language Pathology, Northern Illinois University,1990  
B.S., Communication Disorders, Northern Illinois University,1989

Professor Oesterreich has worked as s a school-based Speech and Language Pathologist for 31 years in the public school system.  During that time, she provided speech-language support to children of a variety of ages within all communication deficit areas.  Throughout her 31 years in the educational setting, Professor Oesterreich participated in continuing education experiences, including specialized training in Picture Exchange Systems (PECS), Augmentative Communication Devices, Lindamood Bell reading programs, and Michelle Garcia Winner trainings.  She was a leader in the Response to Intervention movement and provided in-services to other professionals throughout the United States.

Professor Oesterreich retired from Plainfield School District 202 to enter the private sector and educate future speech-language pathologists in higher education.  She created a private mobile speech therapy company where she provides individual and group therapy to children.  She has worked with others throughout the United States set up similar mobile offices designed to treat communication disorders.  


 Roger Reeter, M.A., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor

M.A., Speech Language Pathology, University of Northern Iowa, 2012
B.A., Communication Sciences and Disorders, Eastern Illinois University, 2010

Professor Reeter is an Adjunct Professor in the Speech-Language Pathology program at Lewis University. As a student, he served two terms as a regional counselor and one term as the national president of NSSLHA. As a clinician, Professor Reeter works at RML Specialty Hospital, a long-term acute care hospital specializing in complex medical care especially in the tracheostomy/ventilation population regarding disorders of communication and swallowing. His career also includes work in inpatient medical settings serving acute inpatient care, long-term inpatient care, and acute rehab. Professor Reeter has been mentoring SLP graduate students in practicum placements since 2015. Professionally, Professor Reeter has been active in local, state, and national (ISHA, ASHA, NSSLHA) organizations collaborating with SLP and AUD professionals. Along with teaching at Lewis, his endeavors include optimizing electronic medical records to clearly and succinctly report SLP findings to collaborate with other professionals, researching recoveries in critically-ill patients following Covid-19 infection, and finding creative solutions for patients to communicate with limited mobility and respiratory functions.


 Elizabeth Stoffel. M.S., CCC-SLP

Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator

M.S., Speech-Language Pathology, Marquette University, 1990
B.A. Communicative Disorders, Valparaiso University, 1988

Professor Stoffel is an Adjunct Professor/Clinical Educator in the Master of Science in Speech Language Pathology program at Lewis University. She is currently a clinical supervisor for graduate students at the Specialty clinic at Mayslake Village which provides first year graduate students an introduction to evaluation, treatment planning and execution of therapy for adults with a wide variety of speech, language, voice, AAC and cognitive communication deficits. She developed and directs the Specialty clinic at Naperville Senior Center, whose members provide entry level graduate students opportunity and experience working with adults with varying neurological and cognitive-communication difficulties.  As a speech-language pathologist, her clinical experience focused on adult evaluation and treatment in acute hospital inpatient, acute rehabilitation, day treatment, outpatient, long term acute care, skilled nursing, and home health settings. She has successfully supported many CFY students, taught basic sign language to hospital staff towards successful communication with deaf individuals, and served as an invited guest speaker at various organizations in support of senior services. Areas of clinical interest include dysphagia evaluation and treatment, neurological disorders, and traumatic and acquired disorders of the head and neck. 



Staff


 Jeanine Deibel, M.F.A.

SLP Clinic Director & Adjunct Professor

M.F.A., English, New Mexico State University, 2013
B.A., English, California State University Sacramento, 2010

Professor Deibel is the SLP Clinic Director and an Adjunct Professor in the Speech-Language Pathology Program at Lewis University. She teaches and/or facilitates courses in anatomy and physiology of speech, hearing and swallowing; speech sound disorders; praxis reviews; and phonetics. Her primary areas of interest include English communication as well as online education and management in both academic and technical fields. She has also worked at Lewis University as an editor on curriculum certification in addition to assisting with LMS technology, such as course design and Blackboard. Her background includes being a university instructor in remote, hybrid, and on-campus classrooms in the West and Southwest. As a writing center consultant and English Professor, she has experience with discourse communities and working with ELL students.


 Priscilla De Salvo

Administrative Assistant

B.A., Interdisciplinary Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2020

Priscilla is the Administrative Assistant in the Speech-Language Pathology program. Priscilla served several roles at a near-by school district including District Translator for families that communicated with ASL and Spanish as their primary languages before joining Lewis University. She worked extensively with transitioning families from Early Intervention into the public school district. Prior to this, Priscilla served as an interpreter for a local county as well as for business insurance groups.