English Studies Department

Faculty Biographies


Dr. Jordan Canzonetta

Dr. Jordan Canzonetta

Assistant Professor
Coordinator of Internships
Office: DL-213-N
Phone: 815-836-5793
Email: jcanzonetta@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Jordan Canzonetta, Assistant Professor, earned her PhD from the department of Writing Studies, Rhetoric and Composition at Syracuse University. Dr. Canzonetta specializes in professional and technical writing, algorithmic rhetorics, and rhetoric and technology. As a researcher, she focuses on automation and teaching labor in the college writing classroom, plagiarism detection services, and algorithmic data collection in educational contexts. Her publications have appeared in the Journal of Writing Assessment, in several Routledge edited collections, and she recently co-edited the Best of Rhetoric and Composition series with colleagues in her discipline. As a practitioner of technical writing, Dr. Canzonetta has worked on a government-funded grant project to develop software for intelligence analysts. At Lewis University, she plans to coordinate internships for undergraduate students in the English Studies Department, and she teaches technical communication, professional writing, and first-year writing courses.




Dr. Jennifer Consilio

Dr. Jennifer Consilio

Professor
Director of First Year Writing
Office: DL-211-N
Phone: 815-836-5727
Email: consilje@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Jennifer Consilio, Professor and Writing Center Director, began her career at Lewis in 2005. She earned her Ph.D. from Purdue University in Rhetoric and Composition, with secondary areas in digitality and minority rhetorics. She has taught courses including Writing for the Professions, Document Design, The Electronic Word, Advanced Technical Writing, Writing in the Disciplines: Law Enforcement, Theories of Composing, Rhetoric for Writers, Advanced Writing, and courses in the First-Year Writing sequence. Recent scholarship presentations include "Reuse, Recycle: Constructing a (Re)New(ed) Ethos for Composition Studies," and "Playgrounds of the Mind: Online Play with Identity." She serves as the area chair in Virtual Identities and Self-Promotion for the National Popular Culture/American Culture Association and is currently working on a project examining technology and identity.






Dr. Serafima Gettys

Dr. Serafima Gettys

Associate Professor
Director of Foreign Language Program

Office: MC-005
Phone: 815-836-5544
Email: gettysse@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Serafima Gettys, Associate Professor, the Director of the Foreign Language Program, joined Lewis University in June 2004. She earned her Ph.D. in Second Language Acquisition from St. Petersburg State University of Education, Russia. Prior to teaching at Lewis University, she taught in a variety of institutions of higher education, including UC Berkley and Stanford University. At Lewis University she established an innovative Foreign Language Program, which currently offers courses in ten world languages. Dr. Gettys teaches Russian language courses and a course in Linguistics. Her current research interest is Cognitive Approaches in SLA and is a regular presenter at ACTFL, NCOLCTL, and AATSEEL conferences, as well as a number of international conferences and workshops. She is currently working on the 2nd edition of Russian for Dummies and serves as a member of the Graduate Council.




Ms. Therese Jones

Ms. Therese Jones

Assistant Professor
Director of Writing Placement
Editor/Coordinator of Windows Fine Arts Magazine
Office: DL-206-N
Phone: 815-836-5321
Email: jonesth@lewisu.edu

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Therese Jones, Assistant Professor, began teaching part-time for the English Studies Department in 1994, was promoted to half-time in 2000, and gained full-time status in 2011. She has a Master's in English with a concentration in Literature and Composition Studies from St. Xavier University. Assistant Professor Jones is the Director of Writing Placement, responsible for placing incoming freshmen and transfer students in their first-year composition course (1999-present), and she is the Editor, Designer, and Coordinator of Lewis' annual journal, Windows Fine Arts Magazine (2003 to present). She regularly teaches two classes in the First-Year Writing sequence, The Essay and College Writing 1, as well as the general education literature course titled The Experience of Literature. Assistant Professor Jones serves the Department on numerous task forces, publishes creative writing, and regularly presents papers at conferences.






Dr. Sheila Kennedy

Dr. Sheila M. Kennedy

Professor
Director of DISCOVER
Office: DL-214-N
Phone: 815-836-5580
Email: kennedsh@lewisu.edu

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A proud Lewis alumna, Dr. Sheila M. Kennedy, Professor, received her doctorate from the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Language, Literacy, and Rhetoric program with specializations in the teaching of writing, the history of rhetoric, and sociolinguistics. Since joining the English Studies faculty in 1992, Dr. Kennedy has taught a range of writing courses, from first year to advanced, and has developed various writing courses and workshops designed to help writers use writing for insight and agency. In addition to teaching writing, Dr. Kennedy has served as Director of the First-Year Writing Program and Director of the Writing Center.

Dr. Kennedy currently serves as Director of DISCOVER, a program within the Office of Mission and Identity designed to help undergraduate students cultivate a sense of calling to live and work with meaning and purpose. As part of this work, she is co-editor of Journeys to Purpose (2019), an anthology of life stories about calling written by Lewis community members. A second volume will be published in 2022.

Additional teaching, research, and writing interests include creative nonfiction, narrative identity, contemplative practices and pedagogy, and community-based writing. A co-authored article, Using Mindfulness as a Heuristic for Writing Evaluation: Transforming Pedagogy and Quality of Experience, published in Across the Disciplines (2019), demonstrates how contract grading evaluation grounded in mindfulness can transform and enhance writing pedagogy and students’ writing experiences. Other recent conference presentations include “Let Your Life Speak: Teaching for Calling and Advocacy,” “‘I Must Listen to My Life’: Using Writing to Cultivate Calling,” and “Discerning Purpose: Principles and Practices.” Dr. Kennedy also serves as a reviewer for the Journal of Contemplative Inquiry. She is the recipient of the 2021 Distinguished Lasallian Educator Award.




Dr. Mark Letcher

Dr. Mark Letcher

Associate Professor
Director of English and Secondary Education
Office: DL-215-N
Phone: 815-836-5601
Email: letchema@lewisu.edu 

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Mark Letcher, Assistant Professor of English Education and Director of the English Language Arts Teaching Program, joined the Lewis faculty in 2015. A former high school English teacher, he earned his PhD in English Education from The Ohio State University. He teaches literature and writing methods courses for ELA Secondary Education majors, drama, as well as courses in the First-Year Writing sequence.  His research interests include adolescent literature and literacy, writing teacher education, and teacher advocacy. He is one of the founding editors of Teachers, Profs, Parents: Writers Who Care, a peer-reviewed blog advocating for best writing practices in K-16 classrooms.

Dr. Letcher is actively involved with the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the Conference on English Education (CEE), and the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of NCTE (ALAN). He is a former young adult literature editor at English Journal, and serves as the chair of the 2015-16 Amelia Elizabeth Walden Award committee of ALAN, which annually selects young adult books representing literary excellence, positivity, and broad appeal. He has also served as a commission chair within CEE and the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC).






Dr. Thomas McNamara

Dr. Thomas McNamara

Assistant Professor
Director of the Writing Center and
Writing Across the Curriculum
Office: DL-219-N
Phone: 815-836-5647
Email: tmcnamara1@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Tom McNamara joined the Lewis English Studies department in 2018 and coordinates the university’s Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program. Dr. McNamara was previously a faculty member at California State University Fresno, where he coordinated the WAC program and taught English Education courses, and he completed his PhD at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Center for Writing Studies. Dr. McNamara’s research interests include literacy studies, critical race theory, critical pedagogy, race and globalization, and ethnographic methods. An article drawing on his ethnographic study of Chinese international students has been published in Literacy and Composition Studies. His current projects include another article drawing on his work with Chinese undergraduates, as well as a collaborative project about the Mendez v. Westminster Supreme Court case and its implications for language rights advocacy. Dr. McNamara has presented research at CCCC, the Thomas R. Watson Conference on Rhetoric and Composition, and the International Writing Centers Association conference.




Dr. Pramod Mishra

Dr. Pramod Mishra

Professor
Co-Chair of English Department

Office: DL-221-N
Phone: 815-836-5016
Email: mishrapr@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Pramod Mishra, Professor, joined the Department in the fall of 2010. Dr. Mishra came from Augustana College, Rock Island, IL, where he had taught since the fall of 2002 and had been recommended for tenure and promotion by the Faculty Welfare committee, the Dean and the President.  Dr. Mishra earned his Ph.D. from Duke University in English with an emphasis on Postcolonial literature and theory and his M.A. in English from Northern Illinois University.  He teaches courses in the First-Year Writing sequence, in the general education literature curriculum, Non-Western and Postcolonial majors' courses, and American and British literature when needed. He is also available to teach literary theory and courses in Third-World film. He has published articles on international and postcolonial issues in Ariel: A Journal of International English Literature and CR: The New Centennial Review. He has presented papers and given presentations at the MLA and other places both in the US and overseas both for the academic community and the general public.  Since 2009, he has written a regular column on literature, culture, and society under Crossroads for The Kathmandu Post.  He is at work on two book-length manuscripts—his memoirs of growing up in India and Nepal and a collection of essays on the southern plains of Nepal called Madhes.







Dr. Simone Muench

Dr. Simone Muench

Professor
Director of Creative Writing
Office: DL-216-N
Phone: 815-836-5554
Email: muenchsi@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Simone Muench, Professor and Director of the English Studies Writing Concentration, began at Lewis in 2003, and regularly teaches Creative Writing classes, Film courses, and Publishing Practicum. She received her Ph.D. in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is the author of six full-length poetry collections including Lampblack & Ash (Kathryn A. Morton Prize for Poetry and NYT Editor’s Choice; Sarabande, 2005), Orange Crush (Sarabande, 2010), and Wolf Centos (Sarabande, 2014). Her chapbook Trace received the Black River Award (Black Lawrence, 2014), and her collection, Suture, a book of sonnets co-written with Dean Rader, was also published by Black Lawrence (2017). She co-edited the anthology They Said: A Multi-Genre Anthology of Contemporary Collaborative Writing (Black Lawrence Press, 2018), and her collaborative chapbook, Hex & Howl, co-written with former Lewis professor Jackie K. White, is forthcoming (Black Lawrence Press, 2021).

Some of her honors include a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship, several Illinois Arts Council fellowships, the Marianne Moore Prize for Poetry, and residency fellowships to Yaddo, Artsmith, and Vermont Studio Center. In 2014, she was awarded the Meier Foundation for the Arts Achievement Award, which recognizes artists for innovation, achievements and community contributions. Currently, she serves as faculty advisor for Jet Fuel Review and the JFR Blog, senior poetry editor for Tupelo Quarterly, poetry editor for Jackleg Press, consultant for the Wolny Writing Residency, and creator of the HB Sunday Reading Series.




Dr. Jamil Mustafa

Dr. Jamil Mustafa

Professor
Director of Literature and Language
Office: DL-208-N
Phone: 815-836-5691
Email: mustafja@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Jamil Mustafa, Professor and Director of the Concentration in Literature and Language, joined Lewis University in 2000 after completing his Ph.D. in English at the University of Chicago. He specializes in Victorian literature, the Gothic, and film studies. He has taught Introduction to English Studies, Stories into Film, The Horror Film, British Literature: 1800 to Present, Advanced Study in 18th- and 19th-Century British Literature, and Senior Seminar in English Studies. He also teaches Literary London and is one of the leaders of the London Travel Study. His journal articles include “Obsessional Neurosis, the Paranoid-Schizoid Position, and the Bourgeois Family in Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle” (American Imago, 2021), “Penny Dreadful’s Queer Orientalism: The Translations of Ferdinand Lyle” (Humanities, 2020), “The American Gothic and the Carnivalesque in Something Wicked This Way Comes” (The New Ray Bradbury Review, 2019), “Representations of Masculinity in Neo-Victorian Film and Television” (Neo-Victorian Studies, 2018), "'The Lady of the House of Love': Angela Carter's Vampiric Sleeping Beauty" (Cabinet Des Fées: A Fairy Tale Journal, 2007), and “‘A good horror has its place in art': Hardy's Gothic Strategy in Tess of the d'Urbervilles" (Studies in the Humanities, 2005). His book chapters include “Shadows of the Vampire: Neo-Gothicism in Dracula, Ripper Street and What We Do in the Shadows” (Neo-Gothic Narratives, Anthem Press, 2020), “Haunting ‘The Harlot’s House’” (Wilde’s Worlds, Routledge, 2018), “Lifting the Veil: Allegory, Ambivalence, and the Scottish Gothic in The Bride of Lammermoor” (Gothic Britain, University of Wales Press, 2018), “‘You can’t spell subtext without S-E-X’: Supernatural, Gothic Intertextuality, and the (Queer) Uncanny"' (Supernatural and the Gothic Tradition, McFarland, 2016), and “Rediscovering Pleasure in the English Classroom” (Dimensions of Curiosity, University Press of America, 2004). Forthcoming are chapters in Queer Gothic (Edinburgh University Press) and Middle Eastern Gothics (University of Wales Press). His short story, “Vicious Circle,” was published in the February 2015 issue of The Horror Zine, where he was the featured author. He is currently writing The Blaxploitation Horror Film: Adaptation, Appropriation and the Gothic, to be published by the University of Wales Press.

Dr. Mustafa regularly presents papers in the United States and abroad at meetings of the Modern Language Association, the International Gothic Association, the North American Victorian Studies Association, the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association, and other organizations. In 2019, he was invited to address the National Bioethics Symposium on the topic of bioethics in Frankenstein. In 2017, he was the keynote speaker for the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Convocation.

In 2020, Dr. Mustafa served on the Conference Organizing Committee for Gothic in a Time of Contagion, Populism, and Racial Injustice, hosted by Simon Fraser University. In 2019, he hosted Gothic Terror, Gothic Horror, the 15th conference of the International Gothic Association and the first held in the United States. In 2012, he was selected for the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, “Oscar Wilde and His Circle,” at UCLA’s William Andrews Clark Memorial Library. As Director of the Scholars Academy, he hosted the 2011 Annual Spring Student Research Conference of the Honors Council of the Illinois Region. The 2007 Bethlehem Blog records his experiences as a Visiting Associate Professor at Bethlehem University in the West Bank.






Br. Lawrence Oelschlegel

Br. Lawrence Oelschlegel

Professor


Office: DL-204-N
Phone: 815-836-5506
Email: oelschla@lewisu.edu

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Brother Lawrence Oelschlegel, F.S.C., Ph.D., Professor of English, began a long career at Lewis University when in 1992 he was hired to direct the Writing Center and the Writing Proficiency Examination. Though schooled in late nineteenth and early twentieth century American and British literature at La Salle University, the University of Maryland, and Villanova, he has developed matching interest in Medieval and Early Modern British Literature (especially Gawain, William Langland, ballads and lyrics, and drama).  He is also keen on contemporary Biblical literary scholarship. Brother's linguistic interests are focused on "eccentric" writers such as Gertrude Stein, e .e. cummings, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Wallace Stevens, among others. Currently he is preparing/revising courses for general education and advanced literature studies. Having been a copyeditor for numerous Lasallian publications, he has assisted many departments in writing and preparing new program proposals, program reviews, new forms, and articulations.




Dr. Mardy Philippian

Dr. Mardy Philippian

Associate Professor of English Studies
Associate Dean, College of Humanities, Fine Arts
and Communications
Office: DL-212-N
Phone: 815-836-5287
Email: philipmd@lewisu.edu

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Each semester Dr. Mardy Philippian tells his students, "How you read is who you are," a statement that makes clear his commitment to developing a generous repertoire of reading strategies. The claim also makes clear his love of surprise, especially when it results in the experience of knowing the familiar, as T. S. Eliot wrote, for the first time. Reading and rereading should surprise and, in so doing, sustain the mind, heart, and spirit.

This approach to reading literary and visual texts is quite different from the strategies that characterized reading in the early modern period, the area of research and writing in which Dr. Philippian completed his doctoral work at Purdue University. In the sixteenth century in particular it was normative to read to confirm what one already knew. And yet the English Renaissance was the period of the greatest flowering of creative energy in the history of the English language, exemplified in the work of Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Milton among others. Reading to confirm and to discover are two sides of the same page and experiencing the tension between them is part of what animates and directs the courses Dr. Philippian teaches and serves as one area of his research.

Since 2012 the primary focus of his research has concerned representations of cognitive disability in early modern texts. In an essay, “The Book of Common Prayer, Theory of Mind, and Autism in Early Modern England,” for example, Dr. Philippian considers how the BCP may have served as a social script for parishioners with underdeveloped Theory of Mind (or ToM). The essay appears in Recovering Early Modern Disability (Ohio State U P, 2013).

His reviews, articles, and book chapters have appeared in Literature and Film Quarterly, Film Criticism, Prose Studies, and Forum for World Literature Studies. He has also presented his work at numerous academic conferences in the United States. In addition, since fall 2010, he has served on the editorial board of The Oswald Review: An International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Criticism in the Discipline of English, published at the University of South Carolina, Aiken.

Born in Los Angeles and raised in Paso Robles, California, Dr. Philippian earned a B.A. in English from California State University at Chico and a M.A. in English and Ph.D. in English Renaissance Literature and Culture from Purdue University. He joined the faculty of the Department of English Studies in 2016.






Dr. Ana Roncero-Bellido

Dr. Ana Roncero-Bellido

Assistant Professor
Office: DL-217-N
Phone: 815-836-5492
Email: aroncerobellido@lewisu.edu

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Ana Roncero-Bellido joined the Lewis English Studies Department in Fall 2020, and she teaches US Latinx, Latin American, Spanish Peninsular and other multicultural literatures as well as writing courses. Dr. Roncero-Bellido earned her Ph.D. in English Studies with a concentration in Latinx Literatures, Rhetorics and Cultures from Illinois State University (2017) and a graduate certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies, and was previously an assistant professor in the English Department and Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Gonzaga University. Her scholarly interests include Latinx feminist literatures, transnational feminisms, life writing, food studies, and feminist pedagogies. Her current research focuses on the development of Latina feminists’ use of testimonio methodology to articulate new and revised forms of knowledge, theories and discourses. Through her teaching, Dr. Roncero-Bellido aims to empower students to bring their diverse forms of knowledge into the classroom to educate their whole person and create a diverse learning community.

She is an editorial assistant of a/b: Autobiography Studies. She has presented her research at various conferences, such as the Latina Feminist Roundtable, The International Conference on Chicano Literature and Latino Studies, Cultural Rhetorics, Feminist Rhetorics, and CCCC. Her work appears in Chicana/Latina Studies: The Journal of Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio Social; The Journal of Multimodal Rhetorics; and the edited collection Feminist Pedagogy, Practice, and Activism: Improving Lives for Girls and Women (Martin, Nickels, Sharp-Grier).




Dr. Wallace Ross

Dr. Wallace Ross

Assistant Professor
Office: DL-209-N
Phone: 815-836-5122
Email: rosswa@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Wallace Ross, Assistant Professor, earned his Ph.D. in Language, Literacy and Rhetoric from the University of Illinois-Chicago in 1993. Dr. Ross has served Lewis University since 1997 in a wide range of capacities. Beginning in the SPCE program, working with non-traditional adult learners, Dr. Ross now teaches regularly in the First- Year Writing sequence and offers a number of Topics in Literature, Introduction to Poetry, and Experience of Literature courses for the Department. Outside of the academy, Dr. Ross has done professional writing seminars for executives and trained writers in business settings. He has made several presentations at the ACCA symposium, and his novel, The Last of the Red Hot Humanists, is in the editing stage and should be published soon.






Dr. Christopher Wielgos

Dr. Christopher Wielgos

Professor
Co-Chair of English Department
Office: DL-218-N
Phone: 815-836-5873
Email: wielgoch@lewisu.edu

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Dr. Christopher Wielgos, Professor, a member of the faculty since 1997, serves as both the Director of Film Studies and the Department's Director of Technology and Tech- Supported Pedagogies. He received his Ph.D. from Northern Illinois University and teaches courses in modern and postmodern US and British Literatures, Film Studies, and First-Year Writing. He also has extensive experience in teaching online courses and the short story. He is a regular presenter for the University's Arts and Ideas program, and recently presented a series of ten films and lectures on Postmodern Film. Dr. Wielgos is an award-winning web site author, and recently published an article published in the Encyclopedia of Contemporary Fiction on the work of Mark Costello. He currently chairs the Teaching and Learning with Technology Roundtable and has chaired the Technology Taskforce for nine years.