Summer Seminars for teachers and administrators available

Summer Seminars for teachers and administrators available through August

Published: May 13, 2014.

Lewis University College of Education is offering Continuing Professional Development Credit with Summer Seminars for teachers and administrators. Participants will receive four CPDUs for each seminar.

Fourteen seminars are being presented in June and August at various locations. Pre-registration and payment are required. More information about the seminars is available at www.lewisu.edu/SummerSeminars or by calling Jean Lucas at 815-836-5847.

  • “Reading Strategies in the 6-12 Classroom” 8 a.m.-noon Monday, June 16 Shorewood Campus ($40)
    Dr. Chris Palmi, assistant professor of secondary education, will introduce teachers to and have them practice the following strategies: 4-2-1 Guides, Save the Last Word for Me, Anticipation Guides, Word Family Trees and Directed Reading Sequence Activities. Teachers will leave the workshop with new ideas for their tool kits in order to foster a deeper understanding of content literacy for all learners. Note: Participants should bring one or more textbooks used in their curricula.

  • “Google Apps for Instruction and Assessment” 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday, June 17 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    In the seminar, participants will explore a variety of Google apps such as Drive and other apps for differentiated instruction, student projects, collaboration and authentic assessment in their curriculum areas with Dr. Seung Kim, professor of secondary education. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop their own teaching materials for immediate student use.

  • “Enhancing Play for Effective Learning Experiences” 8 a.m.-noon Wednesday, June 18 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    In this interactive seminar presented by Dr. Rebecca Pruitt, assistant professor in elementary education and program director of early childhood special education, and Ann O’Brien, elementary education instructor, participants will explore interest center materials with a focus on Simon Nicholson's theory of loose parts and discuss how young children develop academically, socially and emotionally while exploring the classroom. This seminar is for pre-school and kindergarten teachers.

  • “Addressing Ableism in the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts at the Primary and Middle School Grades” 8 a.m.-noon Thursday, June 19 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    Dr. Mary Fisher, assistant professor of special education; Liz Pearce, assistant professor of special education; Dr. Will Blackwell, assistant professor of special education; Jennifer Buss, assistant professor of special education; and Dr. Nancy Kennedy, professor of elementary education will present a framework for examining the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and related CCSS resource materials with respect to possible negative messages about dis/ability. Using this framework and the English/Language Arts Standards, they will identify “ableist” messages across both the standards and exemplar texts and suggest expanded interpretations from a non-ableist perspective. In addition, they will recommend alternative texts to use in place of, or in conjunction with, the exemplar texts. Participants will have opportunities to try out this framework in small groups using primary and/or middle school level exemplar texts as well as review a set of recommended alternative texts. Through this process, participants will also become familiar with the Standards approach to measuring text complexity, a three-part model that assesses qualitative dimensions, quantitative dimensions and reader and task considerations in order to identify how easy or difficult a text is to read.

  • “Supporting Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): An Introductory Seminar” 8 a.m.-noon Friday, June 20 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    Dr. Will Blackwell, assistant professor of special education, will present the seminar designed for teachers who want to learn more about supports for students with ADHD. This introductory seminar will focus on the characteristics of children and young adults with ADHD, with an emphasis on recognizing these students' considerable strengths in order to design instructional and behavior support strategies. Participants will gain an understanding of information on identification of learners with ADHD, lesson plans that capitalize on student strengths and behavior support approaches.

  • “MORE Reading Strategies in the 6-12 Classroom” 8 a.m.-noon Monday, June 23 Shorewood Campus ($40)
    As a follow-up to the first Reading Strategies workshop, Dr. Chris Palmi, assistant professor of secondary education, will introduce teachers to additional reading strategies including Text Impressions, Tossed Terms, Semantic Feature Analysis, QAR and Readers Theater. Teachers will leave the seminar with practice and ideas to enhance the teaching of literacy skills across the curriculum. Note: Participants should bring one or more textbooks used in their curricula.

  • “SMART Board 101: Creating Engaging Activities Using SMART Notebook Collaborative Learning Software” 8 a.m.-noon Monday, June 23 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    In the hands-on seminar session presented by Liz Pearce, assistant professor of special education, participants will learn how to use the SMART Board and SMART Notebook collaborative learning software to create interactive lessons. The seminar will cover the basics needed to begin using the SMART Board, including how to use the board itself; the different tools available; software usage and online resources for the SMART Board.

  • “Common Core Standards and Best Practices in Literacy” 8 a.m.-noon Wednesday, June 25 Oak Brook Campus ($40)
    Dr. Deborah Augsburger, chair and professor of reading and literacy, will provide participants with a hands-on exploration of the ways that identified best practices in literacy are addressed in Common Core State Standards, including how to address complex text with emerging and striving readers, suggestions for incorporating subject area vocabulary across the curriculum and ways school teams can work together to find a place for all students in the CCSS.

  • “Access 101” 8 a.m.-noon Thursday, June 26 Tinley Park Campus ($40)
    Presented by Dr. Will Blackwell, assistant professor of special education and Jennifer Buss, assistant professor of special education, this seminar will introduce a variety of methods that teachers can use to support students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Through demonstration, modeling and applied practice, participants will learn ways to eliminate common barriers to student learning and increase students’ access to curriculum, instruction and the physical classroom environment. Participants will be able to engage in small group discussions, examine curriculum and materials and practice straightforward strategies, which can be generalized for all grade levels. While the strategies are applicable to all content areas, there will be a focus on supporting students with disabilities in reading, writing and mathematics. All teachers are welcome to attend. The seminar should be particularly beneficial to general educators and special educators who support students in general education classroom settings.

  • “Skills and Supports for Instructional Assistants” 8 a.m.-noon Friday, June 27 Tinley Park Campus ($40)
    This seminar is designed for instructional assistants and classroom teachers who work with instructional assistants. Presented by Dr. Will Blackwell, assistant professor of special education and Jennifer Buss, assistant professor of special education, the seminar will focus on defining the roles of instructional assistants and developing strategies to help them support diverse learners in a variety of classroom settings. Best practices will be shared, demonstrated and modeled during this session from experienced educators. School policies, responsibilities of the classroom teacher and instructional assistant, procedures, strategies, behavior management and ethics will all be addressed. The session will present a variety of practical ideas for instructional assistants and classroom teachers.

  • “Writing Strategies for the 6-12 Classroom” 8 a.m.-noon Monday, June 30 Shorewood Campus ($40)
    This session is a supplement to the Reading Strategies for the 6-12 Classroom seminars. Dr. Chris Palmi, assistant professor of secondary education, will introduce teachers to and have them practice the following strategies: Shades of Meaning, RAFT Writing, SPAWN Writing, Found Poetry and Poems for Two Voices. Teachers will leave the seminar with ways to assist students in using writing strategies across the curriculum. Note: Participants should bring one or more textbooks used in their curricula.

  • “So When Did I Become a Brain Surgeon… I Thought I was a Teacher?” 8 a.m.-noon Monday, Aug. 4 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    Part 1: The Brain and Classroom Management Participants will learn basic brain anatomy and function with Dr. Lauren Rentfro, assistant professor of secondary education. Through examples and activities the tie between brain structure and classroom behavior will be examined. A wide variety of activities will be modeled, discussed and created to provide a working knowledge of brain-friendly teaching. Participants will leave the seminar with resource ideas and ready-to-use activities.

  • “So When Did I Become a Brain Surgeon… I Thought I was a Teacher?” 8 a.m.-noon Tuesday, Aug. 5 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    Part 2: What the Learning Brain Likes and Doesn’t Like in the Classroom After a brief review of brain anatomy and function by Dr. Lauren Rentfro, assistant professor of secondary education, participants will be introduced to dozens of brain-friendly teaching and learning strategies. A wide variety of activities will be modeled, discussed and created to provide a working knowledge of brain-friendly teaching. Participants will leave the seminar with resource ideas and ready-to-use activities.

  • “Science That Rocks! Energize Your Science Instruction!” 8 a.m.-noon Wednesday, Aug. 6 Romeoville Campus ($40)
    Presented by Dr. Lauren Rentfro, participants will learn about the 5e and 7e models of planning for inquiry-based science, science process skills that cut across all curricular areas and using discrepant events to engage students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Participants will discover that the same ideas can enhance instruction in English/language arts, social studies and mathematics. As a part of this seminar, attendees will actively participate in many inquiry-based activities and discussions. Participants will leave the seminar with free resource ideas and ready-to-use activities. Bring curriculum to begin planning activities for the fall.

    Lewis University is a Catholic university in the Lasallian tradition offering distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs to more than 6,600 traditional and adult students. Lewis offers multiple campus locations, online degree programs, and a variety of formats that provide accessibility and convenience to a growing student population. Sponsored by the De La Salle Christian Brothers, Lewis prepares intellectually engaged, ethically grounded, globally connected, and socially responsible graduates. The seventh largest private not-for-profit university in Illinois, Lewis has been nationally recognized by The Princeton Review and U.S. News & World Report. Visit www.lewisu.edu for further information.



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