Category Archives: Featured Resources

Want Your Own Study Room During Super Study? Enter Our Contest!

Who will be the VIP

*** And the winner is … Vivica Phillips! ***

This semester during Super Study*, get the VIP treatment from the Lewis University Library: win your own study room on the day of your choice!

Beginning Monday (11/13), follow us @lewisulibrary on Instagram and Twitter and watch for our official contest announcement. There are two ways to enter:

  • Retweet the official contest announcement (Twitter)
  • Like the official contest announcement photo (Instagram)

Do both to increase your chances of winning!

We will randomly select one winner from all entries received by midnight on Thursday (11/16). The winner will be contacted via their Lewis University email, Twitter direct message, or Instagram mention on the morning of Friday, 11/17 and must respond by 5:00 p.m. that day. If they do not respond, a new winner will be selected.

The winning student will have until midnight on Monday, 11/20 to select their preferred study room reservation date and time (any 12-hour period during library hours between Sunday, 12/3 and Friday, 12/15).

Enter to win on Twitter and Instagram starting Monday, 11/13: You might become the Lewis University Library VIP!

*Super Study takes place during the last 2 weeks of each semester (for Fall 2017, that’s Sunday, 12/3 through Friday, 12/15) and includes extended service hours and expanded academic support for Lewis students. For more information, visit the CASE webpage.

Get What You Need with I-Share

I-Share advertisement

There are more than 120,000 books, magazines, DVDs and other physical media in the Library’s collection. But what if none of them is what you’re looking for?

That’s where I-Share comes in.

I-Share is a consortium of 86 Illinois college and university libraries (including Lewis) that allow their students to borrow materials from each other. Our I-Share membership means that if Lewis doesn’t have the item you are looking for, you may be able to borrow it from another Illinois library that does. Even better, you, the student, control the request process. Here’s how:

  1. If you’re looking for a hard-copy resource like a book or DVD, you can check the Lewis University Library Catalog and see if we own it. (If we do, the catalog will tell you where in the Library to find it.)I-Share 1
  2. If Lewis doesn’t own a copy of the item you need, you can change the catalog search menu to All I-Share Libraries. That search will tell you what other college and university libraries have a copy, and whether or not it’s available to check out.I-Share 2
  3. If there is a copy available at another library, you can request that it be sent to Lewis by clicking the Request First Available tab. The system will automatically select a copy for you. I-Share3
  4. Clicking Request will tell that library to pull it from their shelves and send it to you. (Note: You will need to set up an I-Share account the first time. It’s quick and easy. This document tells you how.)I-Share 4
  5. I-Share items are picked up and delivered by van every weekday (other than holidays), so it can take a few days from request to delivery. We usually suggest allowing 3-5 days, depending on how far away it’s coming from. (You can also track its progress in your I-Share account.)I-Share 5
  6. When the item arrives at Lewis, you’ll get an email notifying you that it’s ready for pickup. You can check it out at the Library’s Service Desk, just like you would one of our resources. If you want to keep it beyond the due date, you can renew it online via your I-Share account.

It’s that simple!

Another fun fact: I-Share membership has in-person benefits as well. If the library that owns an item you need is nearby, you can go there and check it out with your Lewis ID. If you live near another I-Share institution, you can also return items there and even have your requests delivered there if you prefer.

For more information on setting up an I-Share account, requesting materials, and pretty much everything else you want to know about I-Share, visit our handy research guide and/or FAQ page. You can also stop by or call, email, text or chat with us for individual assistance.

One last thing: The I-Share system is used for borrowing physical resources like books and DVDs. Vendor restrictions do not allow us to share ebooks with each other. I-Share is also not the way to get copies of journal articles—but you can do that! Stay tuned for another blog post to find out how. (OK, if you want to know now, check out this page.)

Get Your Research Off to a Good Start with Credo

Credo collage

Are you having trouble getting started on your research project?

Has your professor rejected your topic for being too broad or too narrow?

Do you feel like you need a translator just to read scholarly journal articles on your topic?

Credo can help!

The Library’s newest research tool is a great place to start when developing or refining a research topic. A scholarly alternative to Wikipedia or Google, Credo is a searchable collection of information from reputable sources such as subject-specific encyclopedias and reference books. It also has some special features designed to help you get started with a research project:

Mind Maps: Brainstorm topic ideas, explore connections, and narrow (or broaden) your focus.

mind map example

Topic Pages: Find suggested resources on common topics, all collected in one place.

topic page example

Links to Other Library Resources: College-level research requires going beyond the encyclopedia. Credo bridges that gap by linking directly to relevant articles from scholarly journals in the Library’s other databases.

credo explore example

You can access Credo from the Library’s Online Database A to Z page or by going to search.credoreference.com

For more help with research topic development, schedule an appointment with a research librarian.

Book a Librarian for Research Help

Research consultations

As midterm approaches, so do the deadlines for those first research assignments in many courses. If you’re having trouble finding sources, choosing databases, or even figuring out where to start, the Library can help!

A research consultation is a one-on-one appointment with a research librarian. Ideal for in-depth projects, these 30- to 60-minute sessions allow you to discuss your research topic with the librarian and determine the resources and search strategies that will achieve the best results. And because the consultations take place away from the main service desks at our Research Consultation Station, you’ll have the librarian’s undivided attention.

To schedule a research consultation, visit lewisu.libcal.com/appointments or go to the Library homepage and click on Make an Appointment. You can select the liaison librarian in your subject area or choose “no preference” for the largest selection of appointment times.

In addition, while most research consultations take place in the Library, you can also meet with a librarian at St. Charles Borromeo (Lindsay Harmon), De La Salle Hall’s Courtyard Café (Kelley Plass), or at Lewis’ Oak Brook campus (Betsy Sterner).

For more information about the Research Consultation service, contact Andrew Lenaghan, Head of Library Instruction and Research Services.

Resources for Creating Your Own Graphic Novel

Graphic Novels

Are you thinking of entering the Library’s “Create Your Own Diverse Origin Story” contest? The resources listed below can help familiarize you with graphic novels as a genre and art form and introduce you to some recent examples with diverse characters and content.

Books about Graphic Novels

Boys’ Love Manga: Essays on the Sexual Ambiguity and Cross-Cultural Fandom of the Genre, edited by Antonia Levi, Mark McHarry and Dru Pagliassotti
eBook (create EBL account)
“Boys’ love,” a male-male homoerotic genre written primarily by women for women, enjoys global popularity and is one of the most rapidly growing publishing niches in the United States. This collection of 14 essays addresses boys’ love as it has been received and modified by fans outside Japan as a commodity, controversy, and culture.

Comics & Ideology, edited by Matthew P. McAllister, Edward H. Sewell Jr. and Ian Gordon
PN6714 .C645 2001
Contributions deal with social divisions such as gender, nationality and ethnicity, sexual orientation, and class, in both mainstream and alternative comic books. Besides presenting an interesting mix of topics … the volume includes material most US scholarship on comics ignores; it treats international subjects, with chapters on the British antihero Judge Dredd, Hong Kong feminist comics, and Japanese manga.

Comic Books and American Cultural History: An Anthology, edited by Matthew Pustz
eBook (create EBL account)
The contributors are PhDs, independent scholars, and graduate students in fields including history, American studies, English, politics, design history, media, Jewish studies, gender studies, and Asian studies. Through a variety of theoretical approaches, the 16 essays examine comics ranging from popular superhero titles to obscure works from smaller publishers.

Graphic Novels and Comic Books by Kat Kan
PN6710 .G736 2010
Comics, graphic novels, sequential art have gained unprecedented legitimacy. The articles collected in this volume provide an overview of this wildly diverse, increasingly popular, and widely accepted form of literature.

Reading Comics: How Graphic Novels Work and What They Mean by Douglas Wolk
PN6725 .W65 2007
The volume contains two sections: “Theory and History,” an explanation of comics as a medium and an overview of its evolution, and “Reviews and Commentary,” a diverse examination of creators and works. The second section spans Will Eisner’s pioneering efforts as well as the groundbreaking modern comics by the Hernandez brothers, Chris Ware and Alison Bechdel.

Super-history: Comic Book Superheroes and American Society, 1938 to the Present by Jeffrey K. Johnson
eBook (create EBL account)
As a form of popular literature, superhero narratives have closely mirrored and molded social trends and changes, influencing and reflecting political, social, and cultural events. This study provides a decade by decade chronicle of American history from 1938 to 2010 through the lens of superhero comics.

The Visual Language of Comics: Introduction to the Structure by Neil Cohn
eBook (create EBL account)
This work presents a provocative theory: that drawings and sequential images are structured the same as language. Building on contemporary theories from linguistics and cognitive psychology, it argues that comics are written in a visual language of sequential images that combines with text.

Examples of Graphic Novels with Diverse Characters and/or Themes

Black Panther. Book One: A Nation Under our Feet, written by Ta-Nehisi Coates
GRAPHIC PN6728.B523 C63 2016
A new era begins for the Black Panther! MacArthur Genius and National Book Award-winning writer T-Nehisi Coates (BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME) takes the helm, confronting T’Challa with a dramatic upheaval in Wakanda that will make leading the African nation tougher than ever before.

El Deafo, by Cece Bell
GRAPHIC HV2534.B44 A3 2014
In this funny, poignant graphic novel memoir, author/illustrator Cece Bell chronicles her hearing loss at a young age and her subsequent experiences with the Phonic Ear, a very powerful–and very awkward–hearing aid.

March. Book One
March. Book Two
Written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin
GRAPHIC E840.8.L43 A3
This graphic novel is Congressman John Lewis’ first-hand account of his lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Maus: A Survivor’s Tale by Art Spiegelman
Book I: My Father Bleeds History
GRAPHIC D810.J4 S643 1986
Book II: And Here My Troubles Began
GRAPHIC D804.3 .S66 1991
A story of a Jewish survivor of Hitler’s Europe and his son, a cartoonist who tries to come to terms with his father’s story and history itself.

Miles Morales: The Ultimate Spider-Man. Ultimate Collection, Book One, written by Brian Michael Bendis
GRAPHIC PN6728.S6 B4425 2015
Miles Morales takes up the mantle of the Ultimate Spider-Man! Before Peter Parker died, young Miles was poised to start the next chapter in his life in a new school. Then, a spider’s bite granted the teenager incredible arachnid-like powers. Now, Miles has been thrust into a world he doesn’t understand, with only gut instinct and a little thing called responsibility as his guides.

Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection. Volume 1, edited by Hope Nicholson
GRAPHIC PN6790.N72 M66 2016)
Moonshot is a project that is a thrilling new collection that showcases diverse aboriginal representation in comic books. This is an anthology of stories about identity, culture, and spirituality told by writers and artists from a range of communities across North America including many creators that identify as Métis, Inuit, Dene, Anishnaabe, Cree, Mi’kmaq, Caddo, Haida, Sioux, and Suquamish, among others.

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1, No Normal, written by G. Willow Wilson
GRAPHIC PN6728.M766 W55 2014
Kamala Khan is an ordinary girl from Jersey City — until she’s suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. But who truly is the new Ms. Marvel? Teenager? Muslim? Inhuman? Find out as she takes the Marvel Universe by storm!

Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return by Marjane Satrapi
GRAPHIC PN6747.S245 P4913 2005
The great-granddaughter of Iran’s last emperor and the daughter of ardent Marxists continues her description of growing up in Tehran–a country plagued by political upheaval and vast contradictions between public and private life.

The Shadow Hero, written by Gene Luen Yang
GRAPHIC PN6727.Y36 S42 2014
In the comics boom of the 1940s, a legend was born: the Green Turtle. He solved crimes and fought injustice just like the other comics characters. But this mysterious masked crusader was hiding something more than your run-of-the-mill secret identity: the Green Turtle was the first Asian American super hero. The comic had a short run before lapsing into obscurity, but Gene Luen Yang has revived this character in Shadow Hero, a new graphic novel that creates an origin story for the Green Turtle.

New Look, New Features for A to Z Databases Page

New A to Z databases page

Our Online Databases A to Z page has a new look!

If you’re a regular user of our A to Z databases list, you’ve probably noticed that it looks a little different. The changes aren’t just cosmetic, though. The new A to Z page also has some new features to make your research even more efficient:

  • Search for databases by subject. Now you can select your major or area of study from the drop-down menu for a list of recommended resources in your subject area. In addition to subscription databases, the list also includes relevant research guides and contact information for the librarian who specializes in that field.
  • Search for databases by content type. Are you looking for ebooks? Open-access resources? Use the drop-down menu to find the resources that best fit your needs.
  • Search for databases by vendor. You may know our resources by names like Ovid and EBSCO. Those are actually vendors who provide databases such as PsycINFO and Business Source Complete. Now you can sort the A to Z list by vendor to see which company provides which databases.
  • Find out about free trials. The Library regularly offers free trial access to resources outside of our collection. Trial databases can now be accessed on our A to Z page. Right now we have trial access to Civil War Primary Sources, HeinOnline Government, Politics, and Law, Latin American News Digest, Sage Research Methods Videos, and SciFinder. We’re evaluating all of these for possible future subscriptions, so if you like them, let us know!
  • Find out about new resources. Access arXiv, which provides open access to e-prints in physics, math, computer science, quantitative biology, quantitative finance, and statistics, from the A to Z page.

If you have questions about the new A to Z Databases page or any of the resources on it, let us know! You can contact a librarian by phone, email, text message, or online chat–and of course, you can always stop by for a demo.

Happy searching!

June is GLBT Book Month

GLBT book display 1

Join the Lewis University Library in celebrating GLBT Book Month!

In 2015, the American Library Association, in coordination with the Office of Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services and the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table, officially established June as GLBT Book Month.

GLBT book display 2GLBT Book Month is a celebration of authors and writings that reflect the lives and experiences of the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender community. ALA also recognizes notable GLBT books via its Stonewall Book Awards, the first award for GLBT literature, as well as the Rainbow Books and Over the Rainbow Books lists.

Now, hundreds of libraries across the nation are celebrating GLBT Book Month, including ours! The works of authors such as Oscar Wilde, Augusten Burroughs, and Marion Dane Bauer are on display in the Periodical section of the Library throughout the month of June.

Books in our GBLT Book Month display are available for check out, so stop by today and read with pride.

Save

Learn More about Black History

Books by and about African Americans are on display in the first floor Periodicals area.

Books by and about African Americans are on display in the first floor Periodicals area.

February is Black History Month. Explore these online resources to learn more about black history and culture, or stop by the Library’s first floor lobby and in the Periodicals area and check out our displays containing books and movies by and about African Americans.

Black Thought and Culture
Black Thought and Culture contains more than 1,300 sources focusing on the published nonfiction works of leading African Americans, including interviews, journal articles, speeches, essays, pamphlets, letters and other fugitive material. In some cases, the complete published non-fiction works are included.

Ethnic NewsWatch
Ethnic NewsWatch is actually two databases in one. Ethnic NewsWatch: A History offers a rare collection of more than 30 full-text titles from the African American, Hispanic American, and Native American presses from 1959-1989. Ethnic NewsWatch covers 1990 to the present and includes newspapers (including the Chicago Defender), magazines, and journals of the ethnic and minority press, providing researchers access to essential, often overlooked perspectives.

Black Literature Criticism
Black Literature Criticism is a publication that focuses on writers and works published since 1950. The majority of the authors surveyed are African American, but representative African and Caribbean authors are also included. It provides beautiful illustrations of the authors, along with a great look into the works of notable authors such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Octavia Butler, Ousmane Sembene, and many more.

Featured Resource: Apocalyptic Imaginations

Sept. Featured Resource

Edited by Associate Professor Clare Rothschild and written by Lewis students in her 200-level theology course, Apocalyptic Imaginations is a collection of 20 fictional apocalypses inspired by the political situations in areas of the world such as Sudan, Afghanistan, and Ukraine.

The book’s origin story begins in Fall 2014 with the introduction of a new course, Special Topics: Revelations and Other Apocalypses. Inspired by the current “zombie craze” that produced The Walking Dead, 28 Days Later, and World War Z, the course focused on ancient and modern literary expressions of apocalypse. For their capstone assignment, students were required to write their own fictional apocalypse from the point of view of an individual in a contemporary political crisis.

Rothschild was so moved by her students’ final essays that she sought a publisher for their work. Scholar R. Matthew Calhoun, an expert in the field, worked with Rothschild and the students to edit the essays into published form and also wrote the book’s introduction. Local artist Nathan Little created the cover illustration, which is inspired by Durer’s images from the Book of Revelation.

The essays range from the literal to the symbolic, such as Lauren Rexroad’s “Similtudes of Eeyore and the Hundred Acre Wood,” a children’s story that includes a hidden critique of the situation in North Korea. Some, like Toni Focosi’s “Apocalypse of Luke” (the one from Tatooine), draw on contemporary pop culture. Others, such as Anthony LaRocca’s “Apocalypse of Sardar Khan,” reflect students’ personal experiences: LaRocca, a veteran of the U.S. Marines who served in Afghanistan, wrote his apocalypse from the perspective of a member of the Taliban.

Apocalyptic Imaginations is available for checkout at the Lewis Library. Look for it on the second floor (call number PR 2015.R68 2015) or ask a library staff member for help finding it.

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