Doherty Center for Aviation and Health Research

Faculty Funded Work

The Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Monitoring Project – Phase II

Dr. James V. Rago, Ph.D.
Lewis University

ABSTRACT

The following is an outline of Phase II of the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Monitoring Project, which is a continuation of a project initiated in the 2007-2008 academic year. It is well documented that various strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) such as MRSA are rapidly becoming some of the most widespread (and thus, “newsworthy”) bacterial pathogens in the world. The overall thrust of Phase II of this project is twofold: (1) to generate antibiotic resistance profiles for various strains of S. aureus found in selected environments in the Chicago area, and (2) to perform a confirmatory genetic analysis of selected isolates believed to be MRSA. These data will be used to create a constantly updated epidemiological database of clinically relevant strains of S. aureus (and MRSA) in the community. This project will give both the students and interested members of the Biology Department the opportunity to get involved in a formal, externally funded, and clinically relevant research project. The majority of the funds being requested in this proposal are for many of the perishable items that are necessary to continue the study, as much of the funds requested in Phase I of the study have already been used to purchase many of the non-renewable items that will be used in Phase II of the project.


The Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Monitoring Project

Dr. James V. Rago, Ph.D.
Lewis University

ABSTRACT

The following is an outline of the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Monitoring Project, which I propose to implement at Lewis University in the near future. It is well documented that various strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) such as MRSA are rapidly becoming some of the most widespread and dangerous bacterial pathogens in the world (especially in clinical environments). The overall thrust of this project is twofold: (1) to generate antibiotic resistance profiles for various pathogenic strains of S. aureus found in (but not limited to) selected clinical environments in the Chicago area, and (2) to perform various genetic analyses of selected isolates. These data will be used to create a constantly updated epidemiological database of clinically relevant strains of MRSA in the community. This project will (among other goals) result in the following institutional outcomes: (1) to give both the students and interested members of the Biology Department the opportunity to get involved in a formal, externally funded, and clinically relevant research project, and (2) to help Lewis University forge relationships with local hospitals and other interested health care facilities who could benefit from the data gathered in this research project. The funds being requested in this proposal are for the express purpose of setting up the experimental protocols that will be used, and selecting the people and facilities that will hopefully be participating in this endeavor with us.