Undergraduate Course Catalog 2011-2012

General Information

Faculty/Staff Directory

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PRE-LAW

Lewis Universityís Accelerated Admission Program with The John Marshall Law School

The John Marshall Law School permits a limited number of exceptionally well-qualified Lewis University students to enter The John Marshall Law School after completing their junior year of undergraduate study.  Students participating in this accelerated admission program receive the appropriate bachelorís degree from Lewis University following successful completion of the first year of law school, and they earn the law degree (J.D.) from The John Marshall Law School after successful completion of the required law school curriculum. Accelerated admission to The John Marshall Law School permits completion of the requirements for both degrees in six years, rather than seven.  The studentís Lewis University advisor in the major of choice will help the student design a three-year program of study at Lewis University.

Juniors at Lewis University applying for admission to this accelerated admission program must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). The John Marshall Law School evaluates carefully the quality of the studentís academic record, faculty recommendations, and the applicantís LSAT score. Successful applicants for accelerated admission usually have an undergraduate cumulative grade point average and LSAT score at or above the median of college graduates accepted into the regular J.D. program.  This means that their GPAs and LSATs will have to be above last yearís entering class averages, so this is a high standard.  Students who fail to meet the standard may yet be eligible for JMLS or another law school after traditional graduation from Lewis.

When an applicantís GPA/LSAT profile is at an acceptable level, other qualifications are considered, including extracurricular activities, involvement in cultural or civic affairs, and work experience. The John Marshall Law School welcomes applications to this accelerated admission program from qualified students belonging to groups underrepresented in the legal profession.

Before entering The John Marshall Law School, accelerated-admission students must have completed 99 Lewis University credit hours toward the bachelorís degree, including all requirements of their chosen academic major and all general education program requirements. Upon successful completion of two full semesters of law school, 29 semester hours earned at John Marshall will be applied as elective credit giving the students 128 Lewis University credit hours, the total needed to complete the bachelorís degree.

Students applying for accelerated admission for fall semester (August) should complete the application process by early January of their final semester at Lewis. It is preferable for applicants to have taken the LSAT by the preceding October test date. Students should contact their pre-law advisor early in the first semester of their junior year to review the admission process. At the time of application, students must be on schedule with regard to completing all Lewis requirements.

Students applying for accelerated admission for winter semester (January) should complete the application process by early September of their final semester at Lewis. It is preferable for applicants to have taken the LSAT by the preceding June test date. Students should contact their pre-law advisor early in the first semester of junior year to review the admission process. At the time of application, students must be on schedule with regard to completing all Lewis requirements.

Students who transfer into Lewis University from two or four year colleges must complete the above stated requirements and also meet the 32 hour residency requirement at Lewis, as well as complete 4 courses (12-16 credit hours) of upper division coursework in their major at Lewis. For the purposes of admission review, The John Marshall Law School will calculate a GPA based on all college coursework completed (not just Lewis University courses) and as part of the application process will require official transcripts from all institutions attended.

Students will be eligible to apply for and receive financial assistance through Lewis University for the period of time they are actively enrolled at Lewis. Once  students are admitted and enrolled at The John Marshall Law School, they will no longer be eligible to receive financial assistance from Lewis and will need to apply directly to The John Marshall Law School for any desired financial support.

Should a student be unsuccessful for any reason in completing the program of study at The John Marshall Law School, the student can apply for readmission to Lewis University for the purpose of completing the bachelor's degree.  Lewis University will consider all courses completed at John Marshall with a grade of ďCĒ or above for transfer as elective credit back to Lewis University.

 

Pre-Law Advising

Pre-Law Advising is housed in the Department of Political Science and Public Administration.  Acceptance into law school is generally determined by the candidateís Law School Admission Test (LSAT) score, participation in a rigorous course of undergraduate study, college grade point average, a written personal statement specified by each law school, and recommendations. As a rule of thumb, the successful pre-law student will maintain a minimum 3.25 GPA in an academic program with a challenging major, double major and/or minor.

While there is no specific undergraduate major or set of courses required for admission to law school, certain programs are recommended as excellent introductions to the study of law and its affiliated fields as well as pertinent  preparations for the LSAT.

The best undergraduate preparation for the LSAT and course work required in Law School is a challenging program of study which develops reading comprehension, critical judgment, logical reasoning, and precise expression of ideas.  A course of study in history, criminal/social justice, political science, English, and philosophy are especially helpful. Students with particular interest in the application of law to business, technology, research, and so forth, are encouraged to have majors or minors linked to those areas. As a strong formation for both the LSAT and for first year law school, the following courses are recommended:


06-300 Writing for the Professions (3)
06-310 Advanced Writing (3)
09-323 The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1941 (3)
09-325 United States Since 1941 (3)
09-381 History of England and Great Britain after 1450 (3)
10-242 Argumentation and Debate (3)
15-310 Philosophy of Law (3)
15-299 Logic (3)
18-200 American National Government (3)
18-210 State and Local Government (3)
18-371 Constitutional Law (3)
23-250 Business Law I for Accountants (3)
81-110 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
81-200 Court Systems and Probation (3)
81-430 Elements of Criminal Law (3)
Students planning to enter law school in the fall semester after graduation from college should take the LSAT at the end of their junior year or the beginning of their senior year. The Pre-Law Program strongly encourages students to participate in and complete a comprehensive preparatory program prior to taking the LSAT. This preparation can be in the form of self-guided study using a preparation manual, tutorial study in a group or with a faculty member, or a specially designed, commercially available preparation course. The LSAT may be taken more than once so students are urged to take the exam earlier rather than later. Multiple test takers should know that LSAT will send all scores to the designated Schools of Law. However, the manner in which the scores are handled by the law school will depend on the policies of the particular institution. Some will consider only the most recent score, some the highest score, and some law schools will average the scores. With this in mind, students should check with those law schools to which they will be applying to ascertain the advisability of retesting. Pre-law students are encouraged to meet with a pre-law advisor. The advisor can assist in reviewing course schedules and providing information on the LSAT, LSAT preparation programs, specific law schools, and the law school application processes. In addition, pre-law students are encouraged to participate in the activities of the Pre-Law Club and the Mock Trial Program and to join Phi Alpha Delta, the national legal fraternity.